WD40 BIKES Dry Lube

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WD40 BIKES Dry Lube

Postby desertguns » Fri Oct 27, 2017 7:25 pm

Put simply, it is not. Dry lube, that is. It is a wet, non-drying clear oil. I think it's silicone based as it's very similar to air rifle oil. I'm sending it back hoping I got a bad batch. Shook it well per directions but it did not "dry to a clear film" as labeled. I tested it on steel & aluminum (no discoloration of either metal) but it's not going on a chain as intended. Just some FYI for your gestation.
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Re: WD40 BIKES Dry Lube

Postby Tomcat65 » Fri Oct 27, 2017 8:19 pm

Hmmm... I bought the WD-40 Bike lube. It's a lot like regular WD, but I kind of like it, easy to wipe off when I need to. I'm in a whole different terrain situation than you though, mud and wet conditions often leave my bike a mess. Wet lube seems to last longer and repel the water. And it helps me degrease and clean as I apply it with the spray.
I do like dry lube (like White Lightning) on the road bikes, It just seems like a better option for clean roads and dry days riding.
I hadn't tried the WD dry lube though, and now I don't need to :)
Thanks DG!
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Re: WD40 BIKES Dry Lube

Postby NightSG » Sat Oct 28, 2017 8:18 pm

Tomcat65 wrote:I do like dry lube (like White Lightning) on the road bikes, It just seems like a better option for clean roads and dry days riding.


This. AFAICT, it seems to be pretty much the same stuff as DuPont Teflon Dry Lube. I've used both interchangeably on guns, bikes and door hinges without any issues. As a bonus, whatever the solvent in it is, that stuff will clean out dirty grease and rust really well too. I've used it to free up seized freewheels enough to disassemble them.
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Re: WD40 BIKES Dry Lube

Postby Tomcat65 » Sat Oct 28, 2017 9:45 pm

Yes! The Dupont dry lube it works inside cable housings too! That is, as long as it's not already rusted and bound up solid, and even better with teflon lined housings. It works inside shifters and on brake levers, but it does not replace grease well. Severely rusted parts almost have to have a petroleum based penetrant. I have a lot of stuff I use in different situations, but My favorites are always nearly empty when I need them. Dry lubes are a BIG favorite of mine because in real life, I'm a woodworker/cabinet maker/carpenter/contractor. Dry lubes don't drip all over materials, don't soak in and repel finish products as bad, and keep my tools running smooth. Car wax is another favorite, and That's a whole other thing. Not all car waxes are created equal. Of all I ever used on woodworking tables and tool surfaces, I miss the original Eagle One Wet with Teflon the most. The new nano-wax is fine for making things shine, but not the same as the old Teflon formula.
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