ANOTHER new Terrex...

The industry is coming out with new riding formats and 27.5 looks like a keeper. Here's where you talk it over with other riders.
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ANOTHER new Terrex...

Postby BigBen » Wed Mar 02, 2016 3:16 pm

So, After much deliberation & help from THIS here forum, I bit the bullet on a new bike. I'm not getting any younger, and live pretty close to work, so this seemed like a pretty good idea. I bought it assembled, so last night I took it apart & put it back together. Today I stripped the stickers, like another poster here did. I make vinyl stickers on the side, so I'm thinking custom ones.... maybe bright green?
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Re: ANOTHER new Terrex...

Postby BigBen » Wed Mar 02, 2016 5:29 pm

Bike rides good, but MAN I'm outta shape..... Went with yella..
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Re: ANOTHER new Terrex...

Postby Hank McMauser » Sun Mar 06, 2016 8:08 pm

Looks good, I really miss the one I had. Damn thieves!
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Re: ANOTHER new Terrex...

Postby BigBen » Thu Mar 10, 2016 12:56 pm

It wasn't me, I swear! :D
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Re: ANOTHER new Terrex...

Postby Wolfgaurd1 » Sat Nov 19, 2016 7:47 pm

I bought mine earlier this year and have broken 2 derailuers and the stock twist-shifter, I am now looking at buying the shimano Deore groupset for around $200.
It has a crank set, front and rear derailuers, hydralic brake levers and disc brakes(160mm/180mm opt.), and matching shift levers. It's a great deal to make a great bike better.
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Re: ANOTHER new Terrex...

Postby dddd » Sun Nov 20, 2016 6:43 pm

The Terrex and Hondo will always threaten to catch the rear derailer on the spokes as long as the stock wheels are used. The spokes are directed out from the hub flanges out nearly to the edges of the super-wide rims, so are about vertical instead of slanting away from the derailer cage.
Some of these bikes even have the rear wheel reflector on the "drive" side of the wheel, so may whack the derailer the very first time that the lowest gear is selected (like mine did in the store!).

I'm using my identical Hondo wheels now on my Huffy TR745, and immediately had the same issue with the sharp cage plate of the cheap Shimano derailer trying to snag the spokes, so I changed to an old Deore XT derailer that has a much more beveled shape to it where it would first contact the spokes. It doesn't hit the spokes often now, the derailer lo-limit screw is in as far as it can be without adding cable tension while in low gear (which would fatigue the cable due to frame flex tugging on the cable). It does hit the spokes occasionally when I travel over bumpy trails while the chain is on the largest freewheel sprocket, but the beveled cage plate of the XT derailer prevents any catastrophic snagging.
I also shortened my chain on the Huffy down to the minimum of "full tight plus two links", which calmed down some of the slapping when I descended rough trails, so chain control is now proven safe after about 340 miles of "sporting" off-road riding so far.

My stock Mongoose shifter was garbage from day one, and by day two it was replaced with some old RapidFire 7s levers I had. The Mongoose twist shifter just would move on it's own and provided too little holding power to stay in one gear. It was just a toy shifter is what it was, to get these bikes out the door looking like a complete bike!

With the stock rear wheel and stock axle spacing, there is room to add a 2mm freewheel or "fixed cup" spacer behind the 7s freewheel, which would add precious clearance between the derailer cage and the spokes after the derailer cable and limit screws are re-adjusted. I can't do this now because I already re-spaced my hub to fit the narrower (135mm) Huffy frame (Terrex/Hondo frames are spaced 141mm).

On the subject of the Terrex, I finally measured the bike's fork at WalMart, and my hunch was right that the Terrex at WalMart has thicker fork tubes than the Hondo model sold at K-Mart, 30mm vs. 28mm, which becomes important when a disc brake caliper is bolted to the left fork leg. The Terrex also has a bigger180mm disc up front, so overall it is an upgraded bike vs. the Hondo. It looks like it will even take a slightly wider front tire than the Hondo, and the fork clearance on my Hondo is narrower than the clearance at the back tire, so again it is significant.

Keep in mind that the Deore groupset uses a cassette-style gear cluster, so is not compatible with Terrex wheels. I've stuck with the stock wheels since last February, but at some point I will find wide, tubeless rims that are cheap enough to tempt me to build a better, cassette-freehub-style wheelset. There are 9 and 10 speed freewheels that could fit the stock wheels after respacing the rear axle, but they aren't cheap, nor are they typically of very high quality. Re-spacing the Terrex/Hondo rear hub for a 9 or 10 speed freewheel is complicated by further extending a slender, delicate rear axle and could make for difficulty getting the rim re-centered, with the spokes angled straight up from the hub the way they are. I dismissed this possibility a long time ago. Even a normal freehub may not jibe with the weird rim drilling, especially after the hub gets respaced to 141mm, but could likely be made to work (and still have the disc in the right spot) simply by bending the left side chainstay inward by the exact 6mm difference, then offsetting the rim to center within the tire's clearance space. A good bit of work all told...
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