Schwinn Traveler III

Discussions, photos and links to classic bicycles; whether they are your own or not.
Forum rules
Be polite and stay on topic

Schwinn Traveler III

Postby jasnooks » Wed Jan 25, 2017 7:49 am

Picked this up last night for cheap. Traded something that cost me $15 for it.
1979-1981 Schwinn traveler III. 21"frame, made in Japan.
In very decent shape.
Looks to be all original, but missing the seat, and both wheels.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
jasnooks
 
Posts: 235
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2015 9:07 pm

Re: Schwinn Traveler III

Postby bikesRfun » Wed Jan 25, 2017 8:07 am

Well if I was a Schwinn collector I would want that in my collection.

What make and model is the rear derailer?

Check online to see if it's a collector's item.
bikesRfun
 
Posts: 388
Joined: Sun Feb 21, 2016 5:02 am

Re: Schwinn Traveler III

Postby jasnooks » Wed Jan 25, 2017 10:31 am

bikesRfun wrote:Well if I was a Schwinn collector I would want that in my collection.

What make and model is the rear derailer?

Check online to see if it's a collector's item.

Shimano 400.
Very short cage, and still solid as a rock.
I did a quick search, and found a couple for sale in a little worse cosmetic condition than mine, and they were going for $20 to $30. So not really worth much.
Or did you mean is the bike a collector's item?

Image
jasnooks
 
Posts: 235
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2015 9:07 pm

Re: Schwinn Traveler III

Postby to the beach » Wed Jan 25, 2017 3:28 pm

Nice find! A Dremel or drill with a mini brass rotary brush would clean the chrome and aluminum without scratching (brass is a softer metal) and would make short work for a nice shine, I buy the brass brushes 10 at a time for around $15 delivered from EBAY or Amazon. A chrome polish would make a nice finishing touch (metal polish might be enough to skip the brass brush because your parts are in pretty good shape). The Schwinns with 3 piece cranks were the mid grade to premium grade bicycles. The 27 inch rims you need for the bike are hard to find and your brakes may or may not be compatible with 700c size rims and tires.
to the beach
 
Posts: 910
Joined: Mon Jun 03, 2013 9:30 pm
Location: New Hampshire

Re: Schwinn Traveler III

Postby jasnooks » Wed Jan 25, 2017 6:22 pm

to the beach wrote:Nice find! A Dremel or drill with a mini brass rotary brush would clean the chrome and aluminum without scratching (brass is a softer metal) and would make short work for a nice shine, I buy the brass brushes 10 at a time for around $15 delivered from EBAY or Amazon. A chrome polish would make a nice finishing touch (metal polish might be enough to skip the brass brush because your parts are in pretty good shape). The Schwinns with 3 piece cranks were the mid grade to premium grade bicycles. The 27 inch rims you need for the bike are hard to find and your brakes may or may not be compatible with 700c size rims and tires.

Thanks for the tip. I think you might be right that just polish will probably clean it up pretty good. If not, I've had good luck cleaning up parts with a well worn green scotch bright pad. Doesn't usually scratch things up if it's well worn.

I just measured my 700c wheels, and it looks like they will work with the brakes, as long as tire is short enough to clear the caliper.
I'd also have to play with the hub spacing because right now their to wide for the Schwinn dropouts.

If it's to much trouble, I'm sure the guy I got the bike from has a set of 27" wheels in his collection. I just didn't have any more money or anything else to trade when I was there.

Btw, based on the date code on the head tube badge, and the serial number, it appears to be made in 1978
jasnooks
 
Posts: 235
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2015 9:07 pm

Re: Schwinn Traveler III

Postby to the beach » Wed Jan 25, 2017 8:19 pm

A large sliding woodworker's clamp can be configured as a spreader for the drop outs, that frame could take the minor adjustment. 700c has endless tire possibilities vs. 27s.
to the beach
 
Posts: 910
Joined: Mon Jun 03, 2013 9:30 pm
Location: New Hampshire

Re: Schwinn Traveler III

Postby jasnooks » Fri Jan 27, 2017 6:38 am

to the beach wrote:A large sliding woodworker's clamp can be configured as a spreader for the drop outs, that frame could take the minor adjustment. 700c has endless tire possibilities vs. 27s.

Yep, also I think I may be able to play with shorter cones/spacers to narrow the wheels down a bit. At least on the rear which is about 14mm to wide. The front is only 6mm to wide, and I don't think I can make that any smaller by playing with cones.
I'm in no rush, so I'm gonna take my time with it.
Thanks again for the tips
jasnooks
 
Posts: 235
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2015 9:07 pm

Re: Schwinn Traveler III

Postby dddd » Sun Jan 29, 2017 1:10 pm

For anyone else who is considering spreading their frame dropouts to use a wider axle spacing, I recommend always measuring the width first, then bending out and measuring each side separately so that each side gets moved out by the same amount.
Anything that pushes one dropout away from the other, where the outward force is on both dropouts at the same time, always results in one side yielding (bending) first, and so the rear dropouts will no longer be centered with the frame's bottom bracket.

The bending force is almost entirely in the chainstays, the seatstays mostly just go along for the ride since they are thinner. But no two chainstays have exactly the same yield strength along their entire length, and although both will appear to be flexing equally, in real life the actual bending will always happen in one chainstay before the other if the spreading force is applied between both dropouts.

Other postings on other websites often say to use "threaded rod" with nuts to drive apart the dropouts for a longer axle. This is the worst possible technique because one doesn't have any idea when the chainstay(s) is done flexing like a spring (quite far as it turns out) and is starting to bend permanently. So one would have to turn those nuts hundreds of turns in both directions to repeatedly test how far that the spacing has been re-set, and would also then still end up with the rear of the frame left off-center from the bottom bracket.

I've got many frames re-set to a wider spacing by laying the bike (minus rear wheel) on it's side and pushing each dropout down/out with my foot until half of the total correction has been reached. Five millimeters on each side or whatever. (Use caution though, and measure repeatedly to avoid over-correcting of buckling(!!!) the chainstay). Supporting oneself over the bike is a balancing act and should be done carefully, patience is key or damage is likely.
Oh, and I use the same approach when correcting an off-center fork that causes the steering to pull to one side...
I move the fork tips toward the side that the steering pulls to, usually just a couple of millimeters, and can then ride the old bike straight down the road with my hands hanging at my sides.
dddd
 
Posts: 528
Joined: Tue Dec 29, 2015 12:04 am

Re: Schwinn Traveler III

Postby to the beach » Sun Jan 29, 2017 6:37 pm

Thanks DDDD. I have never actually adjusted the dropouts before, I just know not to try this on an aluminum frame.
to the beach
 
Posts: 910
Joined: Mon Jun 03, 2013 9:30 pm
Location: New Hampshire

Re: Schwinn Traveler III

Postby jasnooks » Mon Jan 30, 2017 8:24 pm

Just a quick mock up to see how it looks with the 700c wheelset .
Everything fits, and the stand over height is perfect for me.
The saddle and bars are about where I need them. Fine tuning of both once I get the wheels actually mounted. And I'll probably lower the stem/bars once I get the feel for the whole drop bar thing.

Besides the saddle, and the huge (38mm) tires, what do you guys think? Should I go with this wheelset, or should I hold off until I find some period correct wheels to keep it original looking?

Image

Image
jasnooks
 
Posts: 235
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2015 9:07 pm

Next

Return to Antique and Classic Bicycles

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest