Seatpost roundup. Which one works for you?

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Seatpost roundup. Which one works for you?

Postby Tomcat65 » Tue Nov 07, 2017 6:50 am

Seatpost comp.jpg
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We all know that first one, heavy, 1 bolt, steel, notched adjustment, hard to get a precise angle. It's my least favorite saddle clamp, but it works on a straight steel or aluminum seatpost, which makes it the most common style on BBB's. Cheap to produce, easy to assemble, low tech.

Top center, the Kalloy style 1 bolt pivot style. Not a bad design, Holds securely, but adjustment is kind of flaky as the seat can slide front to back as you try to adjust the angle of the seat, and some have a grooved mating surface that can make adjustment notchy. This saddle clamp style also sets the seat back, as the clamp is almost always behind the seatpost center. This is an advantage to some riders, not so much for others.

Top right, this 3T 1 bolt saddle clamp offers an elastomer bushing that some say makes a real difference in ride quality and comfort. Doesn't look like enough to make a difference to me, but vibration damping might be a bigger deal to them than it is to me.

Bottom left, my favorite style, 2 bolt saddle clamp with infinite angle adjustment. There's just no comparison to me when I'm trying to get that perfect angle. loosen one bolt, tighten the other, micro adjustments are simplified and some of these units are stronger than other types of clamps. XLC 2 bolt seatposts are on 3 of my bikes right now. I like a more forward saddle position and this style of saddle clamp usually allows for it with the clamp centered over the post.

Bottom center, BMX Pivotal seatpost and saddle. I never really had a good BMX bike, so I never used one of these. Apparently this type of post/saddle combo isn't for comfort or long rides, but it's very common. notchy adjustment again, Why do some BMX guys point the seat so high in the front?

Bottom right, much like the 3T elastomer 1 bolt saddle clamp, this style is showing up on more and more carbon fiber seatposts. I assume that this is a stronger way to interface with the carbon fiber without crushing it. Crushing a bushing or a slightly tapered cone type clamp would be more tensile strength than crushing pressure against the carbon fiber as the bushing expands, or as the cones press into the mount. Carbon fiber can be very delicate in a crush.

What do you guys prefer?
Do you have a favorite type of seatpost or saddle clamp?
Or do you just ride whatever comes with the bike?
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Re: Seatpost roundup. Which one works for you?

Postby metalman302 » Tue Nov 07, 2017 12:15 pm

Just what came with the bike. The hardtail has the Kalloy style, and the Trance has a dropper with the bottom left style.
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Re: Seatpost roundup. Which one works for you?

Postby dddd » Tue Nov 07, 2017 3:53 pm

Since I ride hard-tail bbb's off road, I always use a suspension seatpost of some sort.

Suspension posts with a sliding action (versus pivoted-link types) work better when the saddle is centered above the top of the post, so these work best when the bike's fit favors a non-offset style of post. Positioning the post rearward causes binding friction in the sliding mechanism bushings, which becomes critical as the post ages and the bushings develop more friction.
Just as with suspension forks though, suspension posts should be serviced once in a while, cleaned, re-lubed and with good shielding/sealing maintained or added as needed.

The BMX saddles get tilted nose-up because they are set so low that the rider only ever sits down on the saddle in a deep squatting position, which tilts the pelvis sharply forward. The saddle is not normally used at all during a typical bMX race, and the riders you see around town on BMX bikes are perhaps emulating the racing look of a lowered saddle.
A fully-lowered saddle also affords more in the way of a jumping kick for riders who are bunny-hopping their wheels off of the ground doing freestyle moves up onto benches and the like, and similarly affords more leg travel for absorbing landings.

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